No road user charges in London

Cars enter the new Ultra Low Emission Zone that has come into force Monday, in London, Monday, April 8, 2019, one of the world's first emission charge for cars. Drivers of older and more polluting cars face paying a new £12.50 fee adding to the Congestion Charge to enter the centre of the capital. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

London has had some road user changes for many years but they are putting them all on hold as David Brown reports.

In February 2003 London introduced a cordon charge for vehicles entering the inner-city area to discourage non-essential car trips. They system has expanded since then.

But Transport for London has now suspended all road user charges in the capital until further notice to ensure London’s critical workers, particularly those in the NHS, are able to travel round London as easily as possible during this national emergency. It also supports the supply chain, the effort to keep supermarkets fully stocked and the city’s continued operation.

The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, said: “”This is not an invitation to take to your cars. To save lives we need the roads clear for ambulances, doctors, nurses and other critical workers

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About David Brown 377 Articles
David’s boyhood passion for motor cars did not immediately lead to a professional role in the motor industry. A qualified Civil Engineer he specialised in traffic engineering and transport planning. What followed were various positions including being seconded to a government think-tank for the planning of transport firstly in Sydney and then for the whole of NSW. After working with the NRMA and as a consultant he moved to being an independent writer and commentator on the broader areas of transport and the more specific areas of the cars we drive. His half hour motoring program “Overdrive” has been described as an “informed, humorous and irreverent look at motoring and transport from Australia and overseas”. It is heard on 22 stations across Australia. He does weekly interviews with several ABC radio stations and is also heard on commercial radio in Sydney. David has written for metropolitan and regional newspapers and has presented regular segments on metropolitan and regional television stations. David is also a contributor for AnyAuto